Make Nine 2019

As will be obvious to everyone connected to me in any way, much of my life and almost all of my actual sewing is largely unplanned. The moment I commit to a project, it turns it to a task rather than a joy – so staying in the unplanned zone keeps things interesting.

On the other hand, planning is akin to procrastination – so the more I think about a project, plan for it and buy fabric/notions and tools, the better. I can spend hours reading sewing blogs (thank you to everyone who writes one, you feed my obsession in a cost-effective way) and greedily browsing on-line fabric stores. This explains the ever-expanding stash of fabric that I own and the many patterns and magazines that are gathering dust.

I think I’m ready to commit though. I have been looking at the other #Makenine posts, instagram pictures and Facebook threads for Rochelle’s 2019 challenge, and feel inspired to gather nine of the projects I’m mulling for this year – and see whether I make any or all of them by the end of December!

1. Sew Over It – Francine Jacket

This one might be regarded as a bit of a cheat – or at least a bit of a cert. My lovely husband bought me the Sew Over It class to make the Francine jacket as my Christmas present, so by mid-March this one should be complete. Famous last words, perhaps …

2. Helen’s Closet – Blackwood Cardigan

In my last post, I mentioned the navy cardigan I’d been intending to make when I came across the black and white lace ponte. Well, somewhere in my stash that navy jersey should still be lurking, and I definitely need a warm layer in navy to complement several pairs of trousers that look odd with a black top. I like the look of the Blackwood, so this one is definitely on the cards.

3. Victory Patterns – Madeleine Skirt

Ssshhh. I ordered this pattern today, and sent it to Patternsy for printing, so again I feel I’ve committed to this project in a real way. As well as the workshop above, my husband also bought me some – well I don’t know if it’s a heavy chambray or a light denim, but it’s a fabric that I think will work really well with this skirt. I’m not sure if I can pull off the ‘suspenders’ bit (braces in the UK surely?), but I think they’re optional extras. I love the pocket detailing, and a swirly skirt definitely works in my world.

4. Itch to Stitch – Brasov Wrap Top

Again perhaps a cheat. I have actually cut out and started to sew this top, but I’m not in love with it so it’s just lurking there in the pile and has become a task. I’m adding it to my make nine list in the hope that it restarts my mojo for the project. The problem is not one with the pattern which is lovely, but with the fabric which has already faded after its initial wash and I suspect will be disappointing ultimately.

5. Sew Over It – Cowl Dress

I believe I downloaded this dress as a freebie last year, when I joined the Sew Over It pattern insiders. It only goes to show that I shouldn’t do that kind of thing – it’s a lovely dress, but because I didn’t get it for a specific purpose, it’s been lurking as a file on my computer ever since. Here’s hoping that this year it will get its outing. Thinking about it, I’ve got a party in a fortnight that I might need to wear this dress to. Hmmm, motivation!

6. Tilly and the Buttons – Stella Hoodie Dress

Idly browsing through sewing blogs last night, I clicked on this one and actually said out-loud “I need this”. As my snoring husband didn’t respond, I then copied the link and sent it to my eldest daughter who I knew was likely to be awake downstairs. She told me to make it, so if I didn’t it would be letting her down wouldn’t it? So I need to buy the Stretch book don’t I? Just so I don’t let her down …? My self-sacrifice is huge.

7. Sew House 7 – Toaster Sweater

This has been on my mental to-make list since it was released. It’s definitely the kind of top I’d get a lot of wear from, so I just need to find the right fabric, the right weekend, and get the pattern and so on. The usual things.

8. Pauline Alice – Lliria Dress

This one’s a maybe. My lovely mum bought me some beautiful cotton lawn for Christmas that deserves a special make. I think the Lliria (how do you even pronounce that?) might be a good option. Once the fabric is washed, and I can get a good sense of its drape, I’ll try an decide it if this is indeed the right pattern for this special project.

9. Named – Kielo Dress

Wow, I got to nine far more quickly than I’d imagined. So, the Kielo dress has been one that has intrigued me for ages – then when I was on the Sewing Weekender, my lovely neighbour snaffled some lovely dark red heavy jersey with the intention of making herself a Kielo. I was enviously stroking it and she realised she had 6 metres of the stuff (some people were very generous with their donations!) so she gave me half. We figured we would share the images of our finished dresses and I’m pretty sure hers was then complete a week later. Mine – well, let’s hope that 2019 ends my procrastination and gets the job done!

Advertisements

Agent Carter – or Coco the Clown?

IMG_2812

After watching both series of Agent Carter again with my teenage daughters, and spending a lot of time discussing the wonderful clothes (and cars) with them, I decided to aim for as much ‘Peggy’ style as I could muster in my future sewing plans.

IMG_2822
(c) Marvel Agent Carter

With this in mind, I set out to make the Victory Patterns Esther trousers.

One look at the elegant pattern lines will show you the reasons for this choice.

Esther-Technical-Version-1_600x

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The deep pleats and swooshy wide legs would clearly turn me into a fearless fifties crime fighter with an extensive and well-tailored wardrobe.

IMG_2821

Or in the alternative, would turn me into Coco the Clown.

It’s a perennial problem with being on the short side of average, that things that look amazing in theory (eg on beautiful models on patterns) don’t always work that way in practice (eg on me).  When I was nearing completion it seemed clear to me that elegance with this kind of trouser demands a rather longer silhouette than I’m capable of. Trying on the fairly final trousers (sans waistband and hemming) gave me a curious and far-from-elegant quantity of fabric around the pleating that seemed to indicate that it might be Hammer-time, but really didn’t say fearless fifties crime fighter.

Left sadly in my sewing pile for the week while the job-that-pays took precedence, I finally finished them off this weekend and now I’m happy to report that I think I love them again. Yes, there’s a LOT of fabric in the area below the waist – and though the pleats are beautiful and elegant, with the pockets and layers of drapey fabric involved, there’s a lot going on. But, at least while standing, they do still make me feel a bit Peggy, and I’m willing to take the rest for a hint of that.

IMG_2811

As a make, the Esther pattern is great. The instructions are detailed with great illustrations, and everything came together as it should. I used a hook fastening rather than a button because the waistband was a tad snug – but otherwise followed the pattern exactly.

The drapey crepe I used was from Fabrics Galore, and the pocket bags were made with a remnant of similar weight greeny-blue satin-backed crepe (as I hadn’t quite enough of the main fabric).While I love the peek of green this gives, it is a dilemma for this pattern – a thinner pocket bag fabric would give a little less weight to the waistband, but as it’s visible (and the pocket is formed from one pattern piece) it really needs to have a similar weight to the rest of the trousers. On the whole, I think you do need fabric with this kind of substance to make the trousers work, but it certainly means that I should have graded the seams caught within the waistband rather more ruthlessly. Ah well, there are worse things. img_2816-e1526249645900.jpg

 

If I were making the pattern again (and I certainly intend to), I’d probably seek out a slightly lighter weight fabric. Depending on how they wear, I might also reduce down a little of the volume caused by the beautiful pleats and very wide legs – but let’s keep an open mind at this point.

Tomorrow is the acid test, as I wear them to work in a secondary school. If the laughter of a hundred children follows me down the corridors, I’ll know I am indeed more Coco than Carter.